Dental Implant Complications in the Esthetic Zone

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Esthetic implant complications and failures can be devastating for a patient and the doctor rendering treatment. Although the course of action required to deliver an esthetic implant restoration may, in certain instances, seem straightforward it has been rightfully suggested that the delivery of esthetic implant restorations be considered a complex treatment modality requiring advanced training and experience.

Providing acceptable esthetics for patients who desire implant replacements requires in depth knowledge of biologic mechanisms, superior patient management skills, and highly developed diagnostic acumen. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians who want to provide esthetic implant therapy qualify themselves by obtaining additional education and experience specific to this advanced treatment modality.  That’s why all of our Sclar Center training courses include both functional and esthetic considerations, and we offer a comprehensive Esthetic Implant Site Development Course.

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Avoid Dental Implant Complications with Cone Beam-CT Technology

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I believe Cone Beam-CT technology and treatment planning software have the greatest potential for helping doctors avoid or reduce the frequency of implant complications. Our in office I-Cat cone beam CT (Imaging Sciences International) scanner allows us to evaluate the patient’s anatomy in 3D and accurately identify the location and course of vital structures such as the inferior alveolar nerve. In addition, dental pathology not seen on plain films occasionally becomes readily apparent with this technology.

When combined with a scan guide derived from a diagnostic wax up that duplicates the proposed final implant restoration, we are able to perform 3D treatment planning as we evaluate all of the restorative and surgical information on the screen. We can then convert the scan guide into a conventional surgical guide to prepare our sites for implant placement or to guide our 3D hard tissue site development procedures.

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Developing a Successful Dental Implant Practice Part 3: Distinguish Yourself

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Marketing gurus in our profession frequently tell us practice marketing begins with communicating our value proposition. If we are new in practice or shifting focus, they frequently tell us to envision what we want our practice to be like and set goals for ourselves that will develop our value and set us apart.

What are important distinguishers for a thriving implant dentistry practice?

This is a question that comes up regularly in our dental implant surgery training classes at the Sclar Center. I thought about this some more today, as the discussions this question opens up are very empowering to participants in our courses.

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The Dental Implant Knowledge Pyramid

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When I left the University of Florida College of Dentistry in 1984, I did an internship in hospital dentistry at the University of Miami Jackson Memorial Hospital, followed by a fellowship there in medical anesthesiology, and a residency in oral and maxillofacial surgery. I became a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery in 1991.

My decision to focus on dental implant surgery took me on a bumpy journey through several additional postgraduate training courses before I developed the competence and confidence to do the very best possible for every patient. I was frustrated by having to go to one place to learn one thing and then another to learn something else that I should have learned first.

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Developing a Successful Dental Implant Practice Part 1: Advice I Give

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Developing a Successful Dental Implant Practice Part 1: Advice I Give

Students in my surgical training courses often seek my advice about developing a successful dental implant practice.

1. My first advice is to become competent through both didactic knowledge and psychomotor training to perform the clinical procedures that are in the best interest of patients for excellent function and esthetics, and to become confident by implementing this knowledge through a progression of experiences with straightforward implant cases, without complexity or complication, before advancing through more complex type cases. Clinicians should advance knowledge and skills through systematic training and experiences.

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